Deutsche Bank More Leveraged than Lehman

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A new document published by Deutsche Bank shows that in Q4 2011, the large German bank was leveraged at a ratio of 40:1 according to the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). This is higher than Lehman Brothers had.

Deutsche Bank is Germany’s largest bank, and the biggest foreign exchange dealer in the world. There has been significant correlation between shares of European banks such as Deutsche Bank and the value of the euro in recent months.

Jean-Pierre Chevallier reports about the high leverage of Deutsche Bank, and notes that Deutsche Bank is one of the systemically important financial institutions (Sifis).

The current leverage is better than in Q3 2011, but worse than the three quarters that preceded Q3 2011, as you can see on page 16.

The bank also has another leverage ratio, which is based on its target definition. According to this measurement, the leverage ratio is only 21. Their full definition is detailed in page 17.

Although Deutsche Bank is highly leveraged for a long time, it’s important to note that Lehman Brothers was leveraged at a ratio of 31:1 before it collapsed and that these levels are not healthy.

It’s also important to note that there were reports in January that Deutsche Bank needed to raise capital.

The CEO of Deutsche Bank is Swiss banker Josef Ackermann, which will be stepping down in May 2012. The debt crisis took its toll on profits, which fell by 76% in Q4 2011.

Further reading: Lose-Lose Situation for the Euro.

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About Author

Yohay Elam – Founder, Writer and Editor I have been into forex trading for over 5 years, and I share the experience that I have and the knowledge that I’ve accumulated. After taking a short course about forex. Like many forex traders, I’ve earned the significant share of my knowledge the hard way. Macroeconomics, the impact of news on the ever-moving currency markets and trading psychology have always fascinated me. Before founding Forex Crunch, I’ve worked as a programmer in various hi-tech companies. I have a B. Sc. in Computer Science from Ben Gurion University. Given this background, forex software has a relatively bigger share in the posts.

12 Comments

  1. Malcomtent on

    There are differences in reporting between the US and Europe. If you do you a bit of research you will see that the DB ratio you quote is not comparable to the Lehman brothers ratio.

  2. Thanks for your comment. I quoted from their report and from a research made by an independent analyst from France. What is the comparable ratio?

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