GBP/USD Stuck in a Range – Will it Fall?



GBP/USD is trading in an almost perfect range in the past week. The longer the range – the stronger the explosion, but in which direction? Here are some reasons for it to go down.

Last Friday, GBP/USD enjoyed the weak Non-Farm Payrolls in the US to rise to new levels. Since then, it has traded in an almost perfect range – from 1.5080 to 1.5240. This 160 pip range saw three tops and three bottom throughout the week, without breaking out. But the situation doesn’t look good for the Pound:

Recent economic data is mostly negative. British Services PMI disappointed with a drop to 54.4 points, worse than expected. Halifax HPI, which shows the change in house prices, fell by 0.6% instead of rising by the same scale. Manufacturing Production fell short of expectations as it rose by only 0.3%, and last month’s drop was revised – 0.8% instead of 0.8% – double.

But the biggest disappointment came from interest rate issues. First, the Bank of England didn’t raise the rates. While this was the consensus, this came after we saw that one member voted to raise the rates last month – Andrew Sentance’s vote came on rising inflation that missed the government’s target month by month.

The decision not to raise the rates was later backed with the PPI figures – producer prices dropped last month by 0.2% when expectations stood on a rise of 0.1%. So, maybe the inflationary pressures aren’t too strong?

Similar to the Euro, it seems that the British Pound mostly enjoyed the US dollar’s weakness rather than its own strength. A drop will find immediate support at 1.5050, followed by 1.4870 and 1.4780. A breakout to the upside will meet resistance at 1.5350, followed by 1.5530 and 1.5833.

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About

Yohay Elam – Founder, Writer and Editor

I have been into forex trading for over 5 years, and I share the experience that I have and the knowledge that I’ve accumulated. After taking a short course about forex. Like many forex traders, I’ve earned the significant share of my knowledge the hard way. Macroeconomics, the impact of news on the ever-moving currency markets and trading psychology have always fascinated me.

Before founding Forex Crunch, I’ve worked as a programmer in various hi-tech companies. I have a B. Sc. in Computer Science from Ben Gurion University. Given this background, forex software has a relatively bigger share in the posts.

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